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dc.contributor.supervisor Goater, Cameron P.
dc.contributor.author Ahn, Sangwook
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-15T18:59:41Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-15T18:59:41Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/5632
dc.description.abstract This thesis aims to determine how parasite transmission responds to temporal, spatial, or ecological factors such as host biodiversity. For this study, I used a fathead minnow/trematode parasite study system and incorporated both field and experimental components. Long-term data on the parasite population sizes in fathead minnows from two lakes in Alberta indicate that parasite population sizes are highly variable. Simultaneous infections by multiple parasite species in fathead minnows is the norm, with closely related parasite species exhibiting similar long-term trends in population dynamics. Increases in host biodiversity is thought to decrease parasite transmission, however, my experiments indicate that biodiversity is not directly causing a decrease in transmission of the trematode Ornithodiplostomum ptychocheilus into fathead minnows. Instead, I suggest that the mechanism behind the decline in transmission is the species-specific modulation of transmission pathways as host biodiversity increases. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : Universtiy of Lethbridge, Department of Biological Sciences en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science) en_US
dc.subject biodiversity en_US
dc.subject ecology en_US
dc.subject host-parasite interactions en_US
dc.subject parasitology en_US
dc.subject trematode parasite en_US
dc.subject Parasitology -- Research en_US
dc.subject Parasitology -- Research -- Alberta, Southern en_US
dc.subject Fishes -- Parasites -- Alberta, Southern en_US
dc.subject Fishes -- Parasites -- LIfe cycles -- Alberta, Southern en_US
dc.subject Fathead minnow -- Research -- Alberta, Southern en_US
dc.subject Parasites -- Life cycles -- Research -- Alberta, Southern en_US
dc.subject Trematoda -- Life cycles -- Research -- Alberta, Southern en_US
dc.subject Biodiversity -- Research -- Alberta, Southern en_US
dc.subject Host-parasite relationships en_US
dc.subject Dissertations, Academic en_US
dc.title Effects of host community structure on parasite transmission and disease risk en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en_US
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Science en_US
dc.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0718 en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0306 en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0472 en_US
dc.proquestyes Yes en_US


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