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dc.contributor.supervisor Womack, Craig
dc.contributor.author Manossa, Geraldine
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science
dc.date.accessioned 2007-05-13T20:28:43Z
dc.date.available 2007-05-13T20:28:43Z
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/227
dc.description v, 107 leaves ; 28 cm. en
dc.description.abstract This study examines the foundation of contemporary Cree performance, tracing its existence to traditional Cree narratives. Contained within traditional Cree stories is the trickster, Wasakaychak. These oral stories are shared collectively, providing the community with relevant cultural knowledge. The thesis concludes that contemporary Cree playwrights and performers such as Shirley Cheechoo and Margo Kane maintain the roles of traditional storytellers because their work informs its audience about the history of the land and also comments on the state of the community. This study further demonstrates how the mythological character, Wasakaychak, remains an active part of Cree society by examining his significance within Tomson Highway's plays, The Rez Sisters and Dry Lips Oughta Move to kapuskasing. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Arts and Science, 2002 en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science) en
dc.subject Cree -- Drama -- History and criticism en
dc.subject Cree -- Social life and customs en
dc.subject Oral tradition en
dc.subject Cree -- Folklore en
dc.subject Dissertations, Academic en
dc.title The roots of Cree drama en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science
dc.publisher.department Department of Native American Studies
dc.degree.level Masters


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