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dc.contributor.supervisor Little Bear, Leroy
dc.contributor.author Crop Eared Wolf, Annabel
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-25T19:20:51Z
dc.date.available 2008-09-25T19:20:51Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/655
dc.description xi, 165 leaves ; 29 cm. en
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this thesis is to explore and provide an understanding of Kainai peacekeeping and peacemaking within the context of the Kainai worldview, employing postcolonial Indigenous theory and a Kainai process of inquiry. Relying on the oral tradition, as articulated by Káínai elders, as a primary source, Káínai peacekeeping and peacemaking is elucidated through an interpretive approach that examines the foundational principles of the Káínai worldview, as well as Káínai values, relationships, traditions, and customs. It is demonstrated how these function in unison to effect peacekeeping and peacemaking. The results of this study further an understanding of Káínai peacekeeping and peacemaking, aboriginal justice in general and Indigenous knowledge. The results will also contribute to Káínai in the development of a contemporary peacemaking model as part of its Justice Initiative. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Arts and Science, 2007 en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science) en
dc.subject Dissertations, Academic en
dc.subject Kainai -- Social life and customs en
dc.subject Reconciliation en
dc.subject Indigenous peoples -- Alberta -- Social life and customs en
dc.title Matsiyipaitapiiyssini : Kainai peacekeeping and peacemaking en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en
dc.publisher.department Department of Native American Studies en
dc.degree.level Masters


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