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dc.contributor.author Abell, Loren
dc.contributor.author Qualter, Pamela
dc.contributor.author Brewer, Gayle
dc.contributor.author Barlow, Alexandra
dc.contributor.author Stylianou, Maria
dc.contributor.author Henzi, Peter
dc.contributor.author Barrett, Louise
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-28T18:51:02Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-28T18:51:02Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Abell, L., Qualter, P., Brewer, G., Barlow, A., Stylianou, M., Henzi, P., & Barrett, L. (2015). Why Machiavellianism matters in childhood: the relationship between children's Machiavellian traits and their peer interactions in a natural setting. Europe's Journal of Psychology, 11(3), 484-493. doi: 5964/ejop.v11i3.957. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/4835
dc.description Sherpa Romeo green journal: open access en_US
dc.description.abstract The current study investigated the association between Machiavellianism and children’s peer interactions in the playground using observational methods. Primary school children (N = 34; 17 female), aged 9 to 11 years, completed the Kiddie Mach scale and were observed in natural play during 39 recesses (average observed time = 11.70 hours) over a full school year. Correlations for boys revealed that Machiavellianism was related to more time engaging in direct and indirect aggression, being accepted into other peer groups, and accepting peers into their own social group. Correlations revealed that for girls, Machiavellianism was associated with lower levels of indirect aggression, less time being accepted into other groups and less time accepting and rejecting other children into their own group. This preliminary pilot study indicates that Machiavellianism is associated with children’s observed social behaviour and aims to promote future observational research in this area. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher PsychOpen en_US
dc.subject Machiavellianism en_US
dc.subject Machiavellian children en_US
dc.subject Peer relations en_US
dc.subject Peer rejection en_US
dc.subject Observation en_US
dc.subject Social monitoring en_US
dc.subject Aggression en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Machiavellianism (Psychology)
dc.subject.lcsh Aggressiveness in children
dc.subject.lcsh Interpersonal relations in children
dc.subject.lcsh Social interaction in children
dc.subject.lcsh Manipulative behavior
dc.title Why Machiavellianism matters in childhood: the relationship between children's Machiavellian traits and their peer interactions in a natural setting en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en_US
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_US
dc.description.peer-review Yes en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Central Lancashire en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Manchester en_US
dc.publisher.institution Neapolis University en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Lethbridge en_US


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