Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Miller, Nicholas Rourke
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-06T17:06:51Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-06T17:06:51Z
dc.date.issued 2008-06
dc.identifier.issn 1718-8482
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/1211
dc.description.abstract The major plot lines of Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov follow the moral development of the Karamazov brothers, Dmitri, Ivan, Alyosha, and Smerdyakov. All of the brothers are, to some extent, portrayed as torn between reason and faith, a divide that echoes throughout Dostoevsky's later work. The chapters "Rebellion" and "The Grand Inquisitor" elaborate a challenge against a belief in religious faith and morality which Dostoevsky attempts to answer through the beliefs of his characters and the effects of their beliefs on their lives. The Brothers Karamazov as a whole can thus be read as an indirect response to the challenge of the 'Legend of the Grand Inquisitor.' en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Lethbridge Undergraduate Research Journal en
dc.subject Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 -- Criticism and interpretation en
dc.subject Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881. Bratia Karamazovy en
dc.title The 'Legend of the Grand Inquisitor': Moral Transformation in The Brothers Karamazov en
dc.type Article en
dc.publisher.faculty University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill en
dc.publisher.institution University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record