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dc.contributor.supervisor Barsh, Russel
dc.contributor.author Gibbs, Ellen Ann
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science
dc.date.accessioned 2007-04-25T14:40:45Z
dc.date.available 2007-04-25T14:40:45Z
dc.date.issued 2000
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/117
dc.description vi, 103 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en
dc.description.abstract This paper purposes to answer some questions pertaining to perceptions of Metis identity (individual and collective, subjective and objective) as the Canadian public's conceptualizations of the Metis have been changed during the 80s and 90s by the works of Canadians historians and by popular media. These changes have been stimulated by the politics of Metis participation in: The Constitution Act, 1982; The First Ministers' Conferences [FM'Cs], 1983-1987; The Charlottetown Accord, 1992 Questions asked are (1) who are the modern-day Metis; (2) how do the Metis define themselves, conceptually and legally; (3) how does the Canadian public, in general, define the Metis? The results of the Lethbridge Area Metis Survey (Chapter Three) are valid for the local area but it is possible that they may be generalized. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Arts and Science, 2000 en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science) en
dc.subject Dissertations, Academic en
dc.subject Metis -- Alberta -- Attitudes en
dc.subject Indigenous peoples -- Mixed descent -- Alberta -- Attitudes en
dc.title The changing face of the Metis nation en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science
dc.publisher.department Department of Sociology
dc.degree.level Masters


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