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dc.contributor.supervisor Epplett, Christopher
dc.contributor.author Doberstein, William
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-03T20:09:05Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-03T20:09:05Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/3499
dc.description.abstract The objective of this thesis is to fully deconstruct and isolate the considerable Samnite contributions to the Roman state during the period of the Samnite Wars. Although the literary sources have espoused a Samnitic origin for many Roman institutions, very little academic focus has been directed towards these claims. Scholars have generally tended to focus on one or two of these claims only as part of a larger argument. Thus no comprehensive examination of Romano-Samnite interactions exists, with the majority of studies depicting a unilateral process of Romanization. Since the Romanization of the Samnites has been widely documented, this study will focus on the reverse process, a “Samnitization” of Roman society. This will be achieved by examining the potential Samnite origins of the Roman military oath, gladiatorial munus, and the manipular organization and its armaments. Although the available literary and archaeological evidence prevents any definitive conclusions, these institutions appear to have significant Samnite elements; this illustrates a vibrant society which was not dominated by Roman society, but actively interacted and integrated with it. en_US
dc.language.iso en_CA en_US
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science) en_US
dc.subject gladiatorial munus en_US
dc.subject manipular organization en_US
dc.subject Roman military oath en_US
dc.subject Roman society en_US
dc.subject Samnite influences en_US
dc.subject Samnites en_US
dc.title The Samnite legacy : an examination of the Samnitic influences upon the Roman state en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en_US
dc.publisher.department Department of History en_US
dc.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.degree.level Masters
dc.proquest.subject 0579 en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0294 en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0722 en_US
dc.proquestyes Yes en_US


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