Show simple item record

dc.contributor.supervisor Wood, Robert T.
dc.contributor.author Albright-Tolman, Jami I.
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-04T15:57:13Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-04T15:57:13Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/5548
dc.description.abstract Despite this study occurring in the early years of the 21st century, women continue to face barriers to working in androcentric work environments. In the corrections environment, these barriers are further complicated by the hegemonic masculinity of the officer subculture and the prevalent stereotypes of women as weak, emotional, capricious, and incompetent. As a result, female officers adopt a variety of tactics and identity practices to gain acceptance into the officer subculture. This study examines the lived experiences of female corrections officers and explores the meaning they make of those lived experiences. In addition, Sasson-Levy’s (2003) theory of identity practices is applied to the lived experiences of female corrections officers, and findings indicate that this theory is applicable to the corrections environment. Furthermore, the identity practices utilized by female corrections officers reinforce and perpetuate hegemonic masculinity in the officer subculture. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Department of Sociology en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science) en_US
dc.subject Women in corrections en_US
dc.subject Corrections en_US
dc.subject Gender and corrections en_US
dc.subject Gender in the workplace en_US
dc.subject Femininity in corrections en_US
dc.subject Masculinity in corrections en_US
dc.subject Women working in male-dominated environments en_US
dc.subject Dissertations, Academic en_US
dc.title Living the code: how the identity practices of female corrections officers reinforce hegemonic masculinity in the officer subculture en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en_US
dc.publisher.department Department of Sociology en_US
dc.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0733 en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0627 en_US
dc.proquestyes Yes en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record