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dc.contributor.author Metzler, Megan J.
dc.contributor.author Saucier, Deborah M.
dc.contributor.author Metz, Gerlinde A. S.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-23T22:53:05Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-23T22:53:05Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Metzler, M. J., Saucier, D. M., & Metz, G. A. (2013). Enriched childhood experiences moderate age-related motor and cognitive decline. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 7(1). doi:10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00001 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/4730
dc.description Sherpa Romeo green journal: open access en_US
dc.description.abstract Aging is associated with deterioration of skilled manual movement. Specifically, aging corresponds with increased reaction time, greater movement duration, segmentation of movement, increased movement variability, and reduced ability to adapt to external forces and inhibit previously learned sequences. Moreover,it is thought that decreased lateralization of neural function in older adults may point to increase neural recruitment as a compensatory response to deterioration of key frontal and intra-hemispheric networks, particularly of callosal structures. However, factors that mediate age-related motor decline are not well understood. Here we show that music training in childhood is associated with reduced age-related decline of bimanual and unimanual motor skills in a MIDI keyboard motor learning task. Compared to older adults without music training, older adults with more than a year of music training demonstrated proficient bimanual and unimanual movement, evidenced by enhanced speed and decreased movement errors. Further, this group demonstrated significantly better implicit learning in the weather prediction task, a non-motor task. The performance of older adults with music training in those tasks was comparable to young adults. Older adults, however, displayed greater verbal ability compared to young adults irrespective of a past history of music training. Our results indicate that music training early in life may reduce age-associated decline of neural motor and cognitive networks. en_US
dc.language.iso en_CA en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers Research Foundation en_US
dc.subject Bimanual motor skill en_US
dc.subject Motor coordination en_US
dc.subject Weather prediction task en_US
dc.subject Keyboard en_US
dc.subject Piano en_US
dc.subject Music training en_US
dc.subject Implicit learning en_US
dc.subject Verbal ability en_US
dc.subject Music -- Instruction and study en_US
dc.subject Music and children en_US
dc.subject Motor ability en_US
dc.title Enriched childhood experiences moderate age-related motor and cognitive decline en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en_US
dc.publisher.department Department of Neuroscience en_US
dc.description.peer-review Yes en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Lethbridge en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Ontario Institute of Technology en_US


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