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dc.contributor.supervisor Laurendeau, Jason
dc.contributor.author Shields, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned 2013-04-16T20:35:05Z
dc.date.available 2013-04-16T20:35:05Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/3249
dc.description vii, 160 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis explores the ways in which modern history-writing practices reiterate race-based categories of citizenship. To investigate these practices across time, I have examined discourses produced by the United Farm Women of Alberta (UFWA) in 1925, and discourses produced by the contemporary magazine American Renaissance (AR). The UFWA were concerned with the promotion and definition of citizenship, and in so doing laid race as a foundation of Canadian identity. AR is a magazine that concerns itself with white nationalism in the contemporary United States. Drawing upon Avery Gordon and Wendy Brown’s theories of history and haunting, I have situated these discourses in imaginative relation to one another, illuminating the “past” in the present. I have also critically examined how I am complicit in reproducing the historical practices under study; as an architecture of history, haunting helps to imagine alternatives for the study of history and social life, particularly our own. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of Sociology, c2012 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science) en_US
dc.subject United Farm Women of Alberta -- History en_US
dc.subject Nationalism -- Canada -- Historiography en_US
dc.subject Nationlism -- United States -- Historiography en_US
dc.subject Nationalism and historiography en_US
dc.subject Racism -- Political aspects -- Historiography en_US
dc.subject Racism -- Political aspects -- Canada en_US
dc.subject Racism -- Political aspects -- United States en_US
dc.subject Citizenship -- Canada -- History en_US
dc.subject Citizenship -- United States -- History en_US
dc.subject Dissertations, Academic en_US
dc.title (Re)imagining history and subjectivity : (dis)incar-nations of racialised citizenship en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en_US
dc.publisher.department Department of Sociology en_US
dc.degree.level Masters


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