Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Sedgwick, Monique G.
dc.contributor.author Awosoga, Olu A.
dc.contributor.author Grigg, Lance
dc.contributor.author Durnin, Jenna-Marie
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-29T21:39:19Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-29T21:39:19Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Sedwick, M. G., Awosoga, O., Grigg, L., & Durnin, J. (2016). A quantitative study exploring undergraduate nursing students' perception of their critical thinking and clinical decision making ability while using apps at the point of care. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 6(10). http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v6n10p1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/5372
dc.description Sherpa Romeo green journal. Open access article. Creative Commons Attribution License applies. en_US
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to explore how a smartphone app influences undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of their critical thinking and clinical decision making ability at the point of care. Using a pretest-posttest approach, the findings suggest that there were no statistically significant differences in the participants’ perception of their critical thinking and clinical decision making ability over time. Statistically significant findings on four questionnaire items pertaining to participants’ perception in their ability to engage in evidence based practice over time suggests that experience with the app, led the participants to believe the app provided them with the information they needed in order to engage in evidence based practice. Consequently, they were less likely to seek information from other sources. Although having learning resources available in clinical practice environments mightenhancecriticalthinkingability,perhapscounterintuitively,thefindingsinthisstudysuggestthathavingaccesstoaclinical mobile app did not positively influence the participants’ perceived critical thinking ability. Nurse educators therefore, must teach students how to be active learners as well as role model the proper use of critical thinking skills. Students need to be reminded to use institutional policies and procedure manuals as well as other appropriate sources of information. Last, students need to see registered nurses use critical thinking and clinical decision making dispositions by asking comprehensive questions, exploring assumptions and inferences, and incorporating varying resources into their decisions. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Sciedu Press en_US
dc.subject Undergraduate nursing students en_US
dc.subject Preceptorship en_US
dc.subject Mobile technologies en_US
dc.subject Critical thinking en_US
dc.subject Clinical decision making en_US
dc.subject Smartphone app en_US
dc.subject Clinical mobile app en_US
dc.subject Evidence-based practice en_US
dc.subject Nurse educators en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Critical thinking--Study and teaching (Higher)--Alberta
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing students--Alberta
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing students--Self rating of
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing--Study and teaching (Preceptorship)--Alberta
dc.subject.lcsh Mobile apps
dc.title A quantitative study exploring undergraduate nursing students' perception of their critical thinking and clinical decision making ability while using apps at the point of care en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Health Sciences en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Education en_US
dc.description.peer-review Yes en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Lethbridge en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record