Psychology: Recent submissions

  • Odom, Karan J.; Logue, David M.; Studds, Colin E.; Monroe, Michelle K.; Campbell, Susanna K.; Omland, Kevin E. (Oxford University PressArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandCornell UniversityUniversity of LethbridgeJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineUniversity of Michiganhttps://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx087, 2017)
    Females and males of many animals combine their vocalizations into coordinated acoustic duets. Duets can mediate both cooperation and conflict between partners, and are common in tropical, sedentary species that may use ...
  • Mitchell, Liam R.; Benedict, Lauryn; Cavar, Jakica; Najar, Nadje; Logue, David M. (Oxford AcademicArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of LethbridgeUniversity of Northern ColoradoUniversidad de Puerto Ricohttps://doi.org/10.1093/auk/ukz003, 2019)
    Vocal duets occur when 2 individuals vocalize in temporal coordination. In birds, duet participation functions to cooperatively defend shared resources, localize mates, and in some species, guard the mate. Previous work ...
  • Kaluthota, Chinthaka D.; Medina, Orlando J.; Logue, David M. (SpringerArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of LethbridgeCabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge (P. R.)Universidad de Puerto Ricohttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-018-01623-w, 2019)
    Many migratory wood-warblers in the genus Setophaga divide their song repertoires into two categories. Category B songs are usually sung before dawn, with immediate variety and short latencies between songs, whereas category ...
  • Schraft, Hannes A.; Medina, Orlando J.; McClure, Jesse; Pereira, Daniel A.; Logue, David M. (ElsevierArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologySan Diego State UniversityUniversity of California, DavisUniversity of Puerto RicoUniversity of MassachusettsUniversidad del ValleUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.12.026, 2017)
    Motor performance describes the vigour or skill required to perform a particular display. It is a behaviourally salient variable in birdsong and other animal displays, but little is known about within-individual variation ...
  • Hedley, Richard W.; Logue, David M.; Benedict, Lauryn; Mennill, Daniel J. (ElsevierArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of California, Los AngelesUniversity of LethbridgeUniversity of Northern ColoradoUniversity of Windsorhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.04.008, 2018)
    In many species of songbird, individuals sing multiple song types, some of which are shared with their neighbours. Individuals may also share syntactical rules that govern the transitions between different song types, but ...
  • Logue, David M.; Takahashi, April D.; Cade, William H. (University of Chicago PressArts and ScienceDepartment of Biological SciencesDepartment of PsychologyUniversidad de Puerto RicoUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://doi.org/10.1086/657978, 2011)
    Individual variation in aggressive behavior in animals might be caused by adaptive covariation with body size. We developed a model that predicts the benefits of aggressiveness as a function of body size. The model indicated ...
  • Oleksyk, Taras K.; Pombert, Jean-Francois; Siu, Daniel; Mazo-Vargas, Anyimilehidi; Ramos, Brian; Guiblet, Wilfried; Afanador, Yashira; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Christina T.; Nickerson, Michael L.; Logue, David M.; Dean, Michael; Figueroa, Luis; Valentin, Ricardo; Martinez-Cruzado, Juan-Carlos (Oxford University PressArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez,University of British ColumbiaAxeq TechnologiesNational Cancer Institute (U.S.)Compañía de Parques Nacionales de Puerto Rico,Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (Peurto Rico)University of Lethbridgehttps://doi.org/10.1186/2047-217X-1-14, 2012)
    Background: Amazona vittata is a critically endangered Puerto Rican endemic bird, the only surviving native parrot species in the United States territory, and the first parrot in the large Neotropical genus Amazona, to be ...
  • Baker-Medard, Merrill S. A.; Baker, Myron C.; Logue, David M. (eScholarship Publishing, University of CaliforniaArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of California, BerkeleyColorado State UniversityUniversidad de Peurto RicoUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://escholarship.org/uc/item/0gg070fd, 2013)
    The loud chorus songs of the group-living lemur Indri indri are a striking feature of rainforest areas of eastern Madagascar. Despite some research on the conspicuous vocal display of the indri, two hypotheses have not ...
  • Logue, David M.; Krupp, Daniel B. (Frontiers Research FoundationArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of LethbridgeQueen's UniversityOne Earth Future Foundationhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2016.00007, 2016)
    Mated birds of many species vocalize together, producing duets. Duetting behavior occurs at two levels of organization: the individual level and the pair level. Individuals initiate vocalizations, answer their mates’ ...
  • Odom, Karan J.; Omland, Kevin E.; McCaffrey, David R.; Monroe, Michelle K.; Christhilf, Jennifer L.; Roberts, Natalie S.; Logue, David M. (Frontiers Research FoundationArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2016.00014, 2016)
    Recent research emphasizes that female song is evolutionarily important, yet there are still few species for which we have quantified the similarities and differences between male and female song. Comparing song rates and ...
  • Trillo, Paula A.; Benson, Christopher S.; Caldwell, Michael S.; Lam, Tiffany L.; Pickering, Oliver H.; Logue, David M. (Frontiers Research FoundationArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyGettysburg CollegeSmithsonian Tropical Research InstituteUniversity of LethbridgeUniversity of Puerto Ricohttps://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2019.00292, 2019)
    The study of tradeoffs between the attraction of mates and the attraction of eavesdropping predators and parasites has generally focused on a single species of prey, signaling in isolation. In nature, however, animals often ...
  • Bonnell, Tyler R.; Clarke, Parry M.; Henzi, Peter; Barrett, Louise (The Royal Society PublishingArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of LethbridgeUniversity of South Africahttps://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.170148, 2017)
    In mobile social groups, influence patterns driving group movement can vary between democratic and despotic. The arrival at any single pattern of influence is thought to be underpinned by both environmental factors and group ...
  • Leite, Tatiana S.; Batista, Allan T.; Lima, Francoise D.; Barbosa, Jaciana C.; Mather, Jennifer (Inter ResearchArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyFederal University of Rio Grande do NorteUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://dx.doi.org/10.3354/ab00655, 2016)
    A predator’s choice of prey can be affected by many factors. We evaluated various influences on population dietary composition, individual specialization and size of prey in Octopus insularis populations from 2 continental ...
  • Mather, Jennifer A. (University of WindsorArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://dx.doi.org/10.22329/celt.v2i0.3196, 2009)
    This paper recounts the author’s experience with giving a Needs Assessment for improvement by university teachers. Subjects were from the University of Lethbridge and the 2008 Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher ...
  • Kuba, Michael J.; Byrne, Ruth A.; Meisel, Daniela V.; Mather, Jennifer A. (University of California eScholarshipArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyKoran Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition ResearchUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://escholarship.org/uc/item/30k9h256, 2006)
    Despite the huge numbers of studies published on the learning of cephalopod mollusks, studies on non-associative learning are scarce. We tested non-associative learning (habituation) and exploration in Octopus vulgaris in ...
  • Mather, Jennifer A. (University of California eScholarshipArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://escholarship.org/uc/item/5hb932x3, 2006)
    This paper evaluates the development of behaviour from the viewpoint of the intelligent and learning dependent cephalopod mollusks as a contrast to that of mammals. They have a short lifespan, commonly one to two years, ...
  • Mather, Jennifer A.; Anderson, Roland C. (Inter ResearchArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of LethbridgeSeattle Aquarium, 2007)
    This paper first explores 3 philosophical bases for attitudes to invertebrates, Contractarian/Kantian, Utilitarian, and Rights-based, and what they lead us to conclude about how we use and care for these animals. We next ...
  • Anderson, Roland C.; Wood, James B.; Mather, Jennifer A. (Inter ResearchArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologySeattle AquariumBermuda Institute of Ocean ScienceUniversity of Lethbridgehttps://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps07649, 2008)
    The diet of Octopus vulgaris was determined from the remains of 649 prey items gathered from the middens of 38 dens in a small area off the Caribbean island of Bonaire. Remains of 35 species of gastropod (19% of the total), ...
  • Mather, Jennifer A. (Kwantlen Polytechnic UniversityArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of Lethbridge, 2008)
    A year ago (Spring, 2007), I was on sabbatical. Being on sabbatical means focusing on my intellectual development rather than that of my students. That also means not teaching courses, but I had been teaching...a non-course. ...
  • Mather, Jennifer A.; Leite, Tatiana S.; Batista, Allan T. (Oxford University PressArts and ScienceDepartment of PsychologyUniversity of LethbridgeUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande de Nortehttps://doi.org/10.1093/czoolo/58.4.597, 2012)
    Prey choice is often evaluated at the species or population level. Here, we analyzed the diet of octopuses of different populations with the aim to assess the importance of individual feeding habits as a factor affecting ...